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This year we are really seeing the demise of boring drywall in favour of walls clad with textures to offer more visual interest. Here are some standout examples that have caught my eye.

I love the look of painted brick, whether it's the real thing or a veneer (seen above). You get a clean look and the texture of brick, it's such a fresh combo.

For traditionalists, the decorative detail of raised paneling always lends distinction and a historic elegance (the walls are painted in Farrow & Ball French Gray).

These supersized logs are the origin of the species when it comes to textured walls. This isn't a typical, old-fashioned cabin in the woods, it's modern and masculine with a weighty quality.

I am a big fan of Brussels' design firm Vlassak Verhulst. They are known for using vertical paneling in their interiors, it's such a crisp counterpoint to the rough-hewn beams in this kitchen.

In this dining room, the paneling runs horizontally to subtly expand this feel of this space. There's almost a zen quality to this room; the black is an unexpected change from typical Scandi white and makes the space feel cosier.

This is one of my favourite kitchens of all time. Creating a feature wall like this in patterned tile is an affordable way to create real design impact, and of course it's super practical in a kitchen.

A mod power room's undulating wall tiles create a mind-boggling effect in a small space; the walls almost feel alive.

 

Ok I probably would have never have thought of this, but you have to admit New Wall's Velcro wallpaper is arresting. The ghostly lamb face image certainly kicks homespun plaid up a notch. In a kid's room, it turns a wall into a piece of art (and can support items affixed with Velcro tape weighing up to 10 lbs., so the wall becomes a playful rotating gallery of stuffed animals and other toys). In addition to looking and feeling like flocked wallpaper, it's a great illustration of how fashion technology is being applied to home decor.

This wood wall by Area Designs goes a step further than surface cladding and is both geometric and organic at the same time. Sculptural and completely stunning, this wall feels special. How could you resist touching these blocks?

Photo credits:
1. House & Home, September 2012, Angus Fergusson.

2. Farrow & Ball.
3. Maison & Demeure, Dec/Jan 2012/13, Jean Longpré.
4. Vlassak Verhulst.
5. House & Home, January 2013.
6. House & Home, February 2012, Michael Graydon.
7. Ceramic Design Studios.
8. New Wall.
9. Area Designs.

Author: 

Suzanne Dimma

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