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Help with computer desk

HHassist's picture
HHassist

When the painter came, I took the shelves above my computer desk down. They were old and sagging (kind of like me).

My computer desk is in the main hallway, near the back door and the kitchen. I need to have shelves for reference books and cook books. I have, I hope, attached a picture of the area. I am looking for ideas for good sturdy shelves to hold those books.

The desk is near my back door. The door is oak with a mahogeny stain. I was thinking of two floating shelves,each as wide as the space permits. I don't know where to get such shelves or how to be sure they will be sturdy. I am not married to that idea in any event!

BTW - I know the countertop is hideous - it will go one day - I will probably get white arborite to mimic the corian in the kitchen.

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I like the idea, and the look of that cabinet in particular. I am concerned about having too many things going on in one area - kitchen cupboards, linen & pantry cupboards, shoe alcove with "hat shelf" - I am trying to unify things as much as possible in terms of finishes and door styles.

I think this is another excellent idea which I should use in a different spot (my daughter's room - that child has an incredible amount of "STUFF", all of which she loves).

Since he can't golf this week, I think I have persuaded DP to custom build shelves for me, along the lines of what Mambogirl "drew". This is quite a coup - he is hardly a handyman - and it took some flattery ( I still feel kind of queasy thinking about the sucking up I did).

Since I am fair-minded (I don't always act that way, but in my mind I know what is fair) I may show your idea to DP, Artsy. He is a neatnik and might prefer the closed shelving. I am going to give telling him about it some serious thought anyway.

Thanks for your help - once again!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

An easy way to add shelving (and you have the perfect niche for it), is to first install a support - you do this using lumber strips,about 3/4 inch thick, about 2 inches wide, and running along all three walls. Then your shelf actually rests on the supports. It's a very easy way to build very durable and supportive shelves.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

We are all addicts on this forum... shopaholics and decoraholics...and none of us are going to a 12 step program!

I like the glass shelves, though I am not sure they would work for this application as I need wider shelves. I could consider two side by side, though. They would be great in my bathroom. I will look at Amazon.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

as much as I would prefer to do this! I will be checking the forum at my office though, so don't think I am abandoning you.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

and so here is another picture, showing the door.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

To the right of the desk is a door, to the basement. If you keep walking past the door, you end up in the kitchen, so the kitchen and desk area are closely related.

The ugly shelving I removed (which was made of the same grey arborite as my kitchen cabinets but was chipped and horrible) held books and a few decorative objects.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I didn't really read the whole article before posting pic but now that I have it says it costs about $210 for supplies. The corkboard below the cabinets is attached to one big flat piece of wood that goes behind all shelf cubes and corkboard too. I cropped the pic but realized I cut a bit of sideview off. It also says you need a biscuit joiner for project.

If you decide you want to look at the instructions for this workshop then I can email you them if you don't have that issue.

Artsy is right though...you may want cabinets with doors to conceal any clutter.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

That looks good, doesn't it? It looks like group of two shelf units. I will look through my old magazines.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I remembered that H and H did a workshop on this. It is from the Dec1998/Jan1999 issue.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

yes, I think that a moulding would hide the brackets nicely & add that finished look...thanks for humouring me Mambo!

Now FORUM sisters let's unite in the rain chant so Dreamers DP get's rained off the golf course...or someone go kidnap that silly golf siren & gag her!!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

have you been to my house? Those shoe shelves have a simple moulding piece across the front and I think that it is the moulding that helps give that finished look!

Instead of waiting for the cabinet-maker (we didn't like him much anyway) I am going to try to get my partner into the garage with his power tools. I think he could put these shelves together, if only the siren song of the golf course isn't calling him. I am going to hope the bad weather holds out for long enough for him to do this little job for me!

Thanks again!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

good work Mambo! Can you do me a favour? Can you try the same shelf with a moulding (simple) across the front of each shelf? So it looks more "built in". Thanks, you're probably thinking "why doesn't she get her own damn photoshop" hehe;)

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I like the brackets that Dyn' posted, but I think that the wood brackets may be the solution. In fact, we had shoe shelves built in an alcove at the back door using wood brackets, just as described and oak shelves that (more or less) match the back door.

Thanks for your help. I will speak to my DP about calling the cabinet maker back.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

here is the bracket, the shelf ends fit in them, can't find a pic on line of it as a unit...the shelf is called Jarpen & measures w79 X d19 cm they are very solid & cleaner looking (in my opinion) than the traditional under mounted bracket...HOWEVER, Im sure as soon as Mambo is done none of this will matter...can't wait to see it!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

a pic of a bracket that Ikea (sorry them again) has that is used with the lack floating shelf...it attaches at the very ends & looks more like a part of the shelf rather than a mounting bracket. I'll keep looking...

Smart??? Coming from you I am beyond flattered (blush) Thank you:)

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Cutting it could work - I could have some cut off each end. 190 cm =74 3/4 inches, I have about 146 cm. The trouble is then the depth, because it cant be more than 9 1/2 inches deep (24 cm). If you look at the picture again, you will see that the desk is angled (like so many other things in my house). I really like your idea, but I don't think I can make it work. I guess I am back to finding studs and installing brackets (which I don't really like).

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Now we know who's older...I'm still stuck on Imperial hehe. I'll bookmark that link!!!:)

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

This link is absolutely wonderful, since I'm mathematically challenged too and only "do" metric, it has helped quite a lot :)

http://www.onlineconversion.com/length_common.htm

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

my measuring tape is in inches & the Ikea size says 190cm wide ( & since math wasn't my forte) I don't know what it all means...any one for a conversion- can it be cut done in the right place so it looks right? Maybe flush to the alcove walls? Stubborn eh?

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I think that a horizontal Lack would look nice and clean, but my space is only 57 1/2" wide - it is hard to tell in the picture, but the desk is in an alcove.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

hope this works...$129.00

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Take a look at the LACK shelving unit (different from lack wall shelf) from IKEA. It's actually a floor shelf but they often hang it horizontally. Very tidy & with the cubby hole feature baskets fit nicely & displaying books seems tidier. AS far as weight, use studs & a heavier screw & all should be OK> We just hung a much heavier piece & alls well. The problem with the floating shelves is they are not built to hold too much weight, then if someone has the misfortune of mounting them just with anchors ( & no use of studs) it can be ugly...have you considered, Home Depot? Maybe they could design something more "built in" even if it is open...

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

as the desk is more or less right in the middle of the house - a good place for it when you have children who might wander off their homework and go someplace on the net that they shouldn't be. I don't like the look of the metal tracks down the wall. If I can't use floating shelves, perhaps brackets of some sort.

I don't have huge, heavy tomes. I keep the big dictionaries elsewhere - it might kill someone if one of those things fell on them! I have some cookbooks, paperback bird and gardening books, a thesauras, some gaming books used by the kids. I like to have those well-thumbed books close at hand.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Who patiently helped me learn how to post pictures. Despite that her DB (DH) was making romantic suggestions, she blew him off and gave me an on-line tutorial. For my part, I annoyed my two children, who "needed" to use the computer, my DP who "needed" me to help him shop for doorknobs and the dog who "needed" to be put in the dog run. OK, maybe the dog's need shouldn't be in quotes.

I got the picture posted on my first try. Artsy, I hope I have made you proud!

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