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HHassist's picture
HHassist

Hi everyone, with the change in season I am once again confronted with a recurring problem. We get an immense amount of moisture on our windows. To the point that it runs down the window & accumulates & turns to mold,(I wipe them down every morning in fear of getting sick from the mold). Often times it runs off the sill and puddles on my carpet, (not to mention I'm terrified of my new silk curtains getting damaged). The house is 5 years old, (we are not the original owners), & have had this problem from the beginning. We have a high efficiancy furnace, & vinyl windows. Any advice would be SOOO appreciated.

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byoung's picture
byoung

I haven't experienced that problem but I would like to know more about it so that I can prevent it from happening in my home. I don't wan't to get sick from molds either. Hope I can know more on how to prevent those molds from coming. Byoung

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

It must be wonderful to be able to paint. One regret I've always had is that I didn't take art growing up. I'm starting now, better late than never! All that science courses I bogged myself with in high school & my career pursuits have always been artistic. I don't know what I was thinking.

Love the mural, my brother had the Lion King ( you know the scene where the baboon holds the cub up) done in tromp oiel for his son's room. Gorgeous! I just think he should have had it done on a giant canvas so the little guy could have kept it. Sounds like you are going to be very busy this season. Congrats!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

That was very informative, thank you! But I've got to say -that all the while I was reading it I'm asking: "how does she from Halifax get to the ontario home warranty act? You are hilarious! And as always very helpful:-))

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

From the province of Ontario's New Home Warranty Program.

Avoiding Moisture Damage

Today's energy-efficient homes are built tightly to seal out the cold weather in winter and seal in the air conditioning in summer. Because of this it is possible that a new home can be severely damaged by lack of ventilation or excess moisture.

It is important to remember that moisture damage to your home caused by the improper or inadequate use of your home ventilation system, or other kinds of preventative maintenance, is not covered by the new home warranty.

What causes moisture damage?

How can I control moisture?

What else can I do to control moisture?

What causes moisture damage?

Your home can be damaged when weather-related water is allowed to enter and remain in the structure. Water from leaking pipes or fixtures that is not immediately cleaned up, and indoor humidity levels that are not properly controlled, can have serious consequences. Sometimes this damage is easily seen; at other times the damage is hidden inside wall and roof spaces. Regardless of where it occurs, moisture damage can lead to serious problems, such as rot and structural failure.

How can I control moisture?

Always use your home ventilation system to control moisture. In a typical home, over 20 litres of water are added to the indoor environment every day. That’s 7,300 litres in a year, enough to fill a medium-sized swimming pool. Bathroom fans, kitchen range hoods and packaged ventilators such as heat-recovery ventilators are specifically installed in your home to help you control moisture and contaminants. Regular use of your home ventilation system will exhaust excess airborne moisture caused by bathing, showering, doing laundry and cooking.

What else can I do to control moisture?

Here are some extra tips you can follow to help prevent moisture damage to your home.

Outside the home

Keep flowerbeds or landscaping at least six inches or 150 mm away from the top of the foundation. Placing soil near or above the top of the foundation allows moisture to come into direct contact with the structure of the building.
Clear eavestroughs of debris regularly and extend downspouts so that water is directed away from the building. Water flow can erode the ground near the foundation and create depressions where water collects. Standing water near the foundation can force its way into the basement.
Fix the caulking around windows and doors and on the roof if it becomes cracked or separated.
Have your roof inspected regularly to ensure shingles, flashing and chimney caps are in place and sealed properly.
Inside the home

In the winter, keep the relative humidity in your home in the range of 30-45%. Lower humidity levels may affect your health and cause things made of wood to shrink. Excess humidity can cause condensation on windows and damage the surrounding wall. When using a humidifier, follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
In the summer, dehumidify the basement to avoid condensation buildup on the cool foundation walls. Relative humidity levels should not exceed 60%.
Repair leaky pipes and fixtures immediately. Clean and completely dry any areas that are dampened or wet within 48 hours.
Store organic materials such as newspapers and clothes away from cool, damp areas. Keep storage areas tidy so that air circulates freely.
Purchase a “hygrometer” to monitor the relative humidity in your home.
If you are adding a hot tub to your home, or have a large collection of plants, consider the amount of moisture they will add to your indoor air and ventilate accordingly.
Never vent your clothes dryer inside your home. If you have a gas- or propane-fired dryer you may also be venting carbon monoxide inside your home!
Investigate and identify any musty smells and odours. They are often an indicator that there is a hidden moisture problem.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I did borrow my parents dehumidifier last year, and I was hoping to find a sol'n that wouldn't need to be baby sat. Truthfully, it's so bad I'm getting stains in my carpet that I'm sure are wood rot. I'm ready to take desperate measures especially because I suffer from serious allergies. And for the babies sake $2000.00 would be well worth his safety! I'll call a couple reputable co. & get some quotes. Thanks again. P.s. if I'm not crossing any boundaries_ what is it that you do? You sound very experienced...

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Amazing isn't it? What a country we live in. Well I know what to send everybody on the west coast for xmas.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

I'm afraid it's all of them. Worst on the upper floor but also in the lower level.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

A relative just purchased something that connected to the furnace to add moisture I thought perhaps there was an equivalent for the reverse. But I guess no such luck. And one more thing, one never realizes how much one doesn't know about such things until one (me namely) reads her posting! I much prefer to think about what looks nice:-) Thanks again!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

appreciate the feedback; I think the first thing we'll do is head to find a dehumidifier. About the dehumidistat we don't have one do you know if there is something we can purchase that can be attached to furnace now? Ball park price? Thanks again!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Condensation is caused from an excess of humidity in the house. So when it's cold outside, you'll have more humidity especially around the windows as it's the colder part of the wall. The best suggestion I have for you is a dehumidifier - that will reduce the amount of moisture in the air as the weather gets colder and the temp inside gets warmer.

We run our Dehumidifier 24-7 and we still have a little moisture but not nearly as much as we used to. We bought our Dehum. from Home Depot last spring, for about $200. Make sure that you get one that is able to hold the amount of moisture relevant to the size of your home.

Tips:
if you have fans in your kitchen and bathroom, use them regularly. Run your dehumidifier 24-7, if you can, and empty it frequently. Keep your showers to a minimum duration (yeah, right - nothing like a long hot shower, eh???)
They (most homebuilding companies)suggest that you open your fireplace damper to air the moisture out, but we've never done that.

I guess it's time to start thinking about this, isn't it? oh joy, the blessings of cold weather!!!

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