Connect with H&H

How do I build a pantry / built-in shelving? I need design inspirations

Azxster's picture
Azxster

I found this wicked pantry at Easy Closets.com
[url]http://www.easyclosets.com/showroomDetail.aspx?g=12[/url]

I want to build something like that, does anyone have advice/designs to offer?

If you look at the picture below, the right side of the cabinet is empty space. I want to design a "pantry"/ built-in shelving. Would MDF be the best? Cheapest, paint-able, easy to work with?

[img]http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/8554/kitchenue8.jpg[/img]

My creative skill is terrible so if someone have a better design, please share! My family does not really drink so I may only have 1 wine rack and we do not use spices. I need storage for junk food, drinks, tea bags, pot of rice, This area will be exposed to direct sunlight however I lack the skills to install cabinet doors because I have never tried.

Can someone teach me how to make cabinet doors, just a solid face plain door.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Younique1's picture
Younique1

dustbunnydiva wrote:
Just about any molding. Think about how two bookcases might be placed together. Instead of seeing the two ends you find a piece of trim molding at the store that will cover the both of them, so bookcases are screwed to each other and the trim is put over the exposed end so it looks like one solid piece.

I looked for some good instructions and this is all I can find at the moment but here are lots ont he web.
[url]http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/hi_home_office/article/0,,DIY_13921_2455889,00.html[/url]
[url]http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/lu_shelves/article/0,2041,DIY_14098_2270752,00.html[/url]

I don't mean to say anything disrespectful as I know you're trying to help, but the articles quoted about have many shortfalls and forgotten points.

A level is a great tool...an absolute necessity when installing. Be sure to have one when doing so. When installing base cabinets, you can place all the cabinets along the wall and level them and/or find the high/low spots (a lazer-level is good for predetermining high/low points). You can mark the stud locations on the top of the cabinets. Plumb and level all cabinets, never assume the floor and walls are plumb and level.

If you have cabinetry that has a face-frame, try to put screws behind the frame through the side (gable) into the next cabinet gable. If there is a space between them, use a space block. This will ensure the face-frame doesn't split.

I would personally prefinish cabinetry before installing.

If you are cutting pieces to length/width with a circular saw, be sure to use a very sharp blade (triplechip 80-100 TPI [teeth per inch] if avaliable) and cut the material with the good side down. The circular saw cuts on the upstroke and will tear out material faster than you can blink. Be sure to always use a clamped down straight edge of some kind.

I always cringe when seeing cabinets built-in-place. It is best to assemble cabinetry first and install it plumb and level regardless of how out-of-plumb/level the walls are. This is why you should also plan in for a filler/spacer on all sides that touch a wall. The filler is not meant for filling a wide gap, but for taking up the discrepancies between the wall and cabinet.

When screwing cabinets to eachother, don't use drywall screws, use particleboard screws. These are a courser thread and hold better.

Your friendly cabinetmaker, Geoff

Younique1's picture
Younique1

Azxster wrote:

Would MDF be the best? Cheapest, paint-able, easy to work with?

My creative skill is terrible so if someone have a better design, please share! My family does not really drink so I may only have 1 wine rack and we do not use spices. I need storage for junk food, drinks, tea bags, pot of rice, This area will be exposed to direct sunlight however I lack the skills to install cabinet doors because I have never tried.

Can someone teach me how to make cabinet doors, just a solid face plain door.

MDF or Particle Board, It's all the same to join together. You use the same screws, glue and techniques to work with both. It is how you construct the cabinetry that counts. That is why I personally would stay away from the handyman stores.

MDF is a beautiful product to work with especially for painting and you can router it and shape it. It is typically about 10lbs heavier per (4x8) sheet than a particleboard sheet. There are many different qualities of all boards including MDF. Search around, ask you local cabinetmaker if they could order you in some. The better quality MDF will be smoother and better to finish. If the MDF looks blotchy in it's raw form, it won't finish well. When it comes to the doors, again, approach your local cabinetmaker and they may order you in the doors as long as you provide the sizes. You can find many articles on-line (ie: FineWoodworking) that will explain how to install hinges. The local cabinetmaker may even drill for hinges.

The best advice I can give, always pilot drill your holes in MDF...that goes for particleboard too. Also, keep in mind that the wider the span of the shelving, the more the sag.

What I see in that picture you posted is cabinetry that doesn't touch the floor....IMPO, a poor design. When it comes to cabinetry that needs to support weight, it should be set on the floor for proper support. Upper cabinets work by only building in certain sizes.

Hope that helps.

Your friendly cabinetmaker, Geoff

Azxster's picture
Azxster

I like to DIY and plus, it gives an excuse to go buy some power tools (circular saw, mitre saw). The reason why I want to build is because I can customize the depth/height. What kind of mouldings allow you to merge two furnitures?

Azxster's picture
Azxster

Please excuse the mess

[img]http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/3619/img3692oa9.jpg[/img]

I am willing to start from scratch and am not committed to building cabinet doors since it appears to be challenging. I am willing to make this built-in to the wall. I really need some type of coverings.

Comment Guidelines

We welcome your feedback on Houseandhome.com. H&H reserves the right to remove any unsuitable personal remarks made about the bloggers, hosts, homeowners and/or guests we feature. Please keep your comments focused on decorating, design, cooking and other lifestyle topics. Adopt a tone you would be willing to use in person and do not make slanderous remarks or use denigrating language. If you see a comment that you believe violates any of the guidelines outlined above, please click “Alert a Moderator.” Thank you.

OK