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Things to Know Before You Build a Fence

joeanna anthony's picture
joeanna anthony

Before you install a fence, ask yourself what your reason is for installing it. If it's strictly utilitarian -- keeping the dog in the yard -- you can probably get by with a basic chain-link fence. If you're looking to block noise or add privacy, you will want something tall and solid. Chances are your wishes are complex: You want to protect pets, but you also want to add a decorative element to your home's exterior. Whatever its purpose, a fence can function in many ways, but the first step is deciding what you're looking for to choose one that works for you.Choose Your MaterialsWood fences may require occasional staining or sealing and can warp and rot over time. Consider a low-maintenance material, such as vinyl, that offers the look of wood without the elbow grease. Other material options include aluminum, steel, wrought iron, and bamboo.Mix It UpIf cost is an issue, mix different types of fences. Wood picket fencing could be placed at the front of the home, for example, connecting to chain link fencing in the back. No only will this combination fence potentially save installation costs, but it also will reduce the amount of fence that might require repainting.Hire ProfessionalsFence installation is harder than it looks, but the American Fence Association makes it easy to find a local fence contractor.If you decide to hire a pro, ask to see examples of fences they have installed. This may even generate ideas for your own fence.Consider ClimateIn cold northern climates that experience frost, concrete anchors are necessary for fence posts. Post should be secured 36 inches deep to avoid cracking in a cold snap. For warmer, damper climates, vinyl is your best material choice, as wood is susceptible to water damage.Be a Good NeighborBe open and up front with neighbors about your fencing plans, and try not to block their views unnecessarily. A party fence can be built and shared by two or more neighbors, but such agreements should be made in writing and only after the property boundaries have been professionally determined.Create EntrancesFor safety and convenience, plan at least two paths into a fenced area. Ensure that one of these is large enough to accommodate bulky outdoor equipment such as a lawn mower, large garbage cans, and the like. Stepping stones and pergolas can help indicate the locations of gates, as can finials or other decorative elements.Dress It UpOnce your fence is in place, customize it with decorative posts or finials. Depending on your home's style, you may want to paint the fence a contemporary color. Consider planting a row of flowers in front of it for a truly welcoming facade. For More Information On Fencing  check  http://californiafenceco.com/vinyl.htmlhttp://californiafenceco.com/wood.htmlhttp://californiafenceco.com/metal.htmlhttp://californiafenceco.com/chain.html

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joeanna anthony's picture
joeanna anthony

Thanks intellg... 

intellg's picture
intellg

You have draw my direction which I have never think during making of fence. I have checked your article. Really helpful for fence contractors.

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