Classic-HH-Recipes--Steak-HH_JA06

Steak Diane

In the 1950s and ’60s, Steak Diane was traditionally prepared tableside and flambéed, but you can skip that step if it’s too elaborate.

Ingredients

Steak

  • 2 tsp chopped fresh thyme (or 1/2 tsp dried)
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1/2 tsp dried mustard powder
  • 1/2 tsp each salt and pepper
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-1/2 lb. boneless top sirloin or striploin steaks, 3/4” to 1” thick

Sauce

  • 375 g fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 3 shallots, skins removed
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 1/4 cup brandy or cognac
  • 1-1/2 cups beef broth
  • 1/4 cup whipping cream
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh thyme or parsley

 

Directions Yield:  Serves 4
  1. Mix thyme, oil, dry mustard, salt, pepper and garlic to form a paste, in a dish large enough to hold steaks in one layer. Trim fat from steaks. If steaks are large, cut into 4 serving portions. Using hands, rub paste all over.
  2. For sauce, remove stems from mushrooms and discard. Wash, pat dry and thinly slice caps. (You should have about 5 cups). Halve shallots; thinly slice lengthwise.
  3. In large nonstick skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of butter over medium-high heat. Cook mushrooms and shallots, stirring often, for about 10 minutes or until tender and beginning to brown. Transfer to bowl.
  4. Add remaining butter to skillet and increase heat to high. Fry steaks until well browned but still rare inside, 2 minutes per side. Add brandy (flambé if desired). Remove steaks from pan; keep warm.
  5. Stir beef stock, cream and Worcestershire sauce into pan, scraping up brown bits. Boil for 6 to 8 minutes or until slightly thickened. Reduce heat to medium. Whisk in mustard. Return steak and mushroom mixture to skillet, turning steaks to coat. Cook about 2 minutes longer or until steaks reach desired doneness. Taste and adjust seasoning. Sprinkle with fresh thyme.
Recipe by:
Jennifer Low
Photographer:
Mark Burstyn
Source:
House & Home January 2006
Stylist:
Food styling by Donna Bartolini; prop styling by Stacey Begg
Tags: