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Pork Chops With Cherry Mustard Recipe

Pork Chops With Cherry Mustard Recipe - Photo by John Kernick

An easy dinner idea from New York restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten. "Cherries and mustard may sound like an unusual pairing, but they taste great together. Sweet, tart, and hot, this sauce goes well with chicken and veal as well as pork."

Yield: 
4 servings
Ingredients: 

2 tbsp dry mustard
1 tsp kosher salt
1 lb. cherries, stemmed and pitted (3 cups packed)
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup ruby port
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp cumin seeds, finely ground
3 tbsp sherry vinegar
1/4 cup honey
4 (9-oz.) bone-in pork chops (each 1-1/4" thick)

Instructions: 

Step 1: In a medium bowl, stir together the mustard and 1 tbsp water until smooth. Let stand for 15 minutes. Stir in the salt until well combined.

Step 2: Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, boil the cherries, red wine vinegar, port, and sugar over high heat, stirring occasionally, until syrupy, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a blender and purée until smooth.

Step 3: Return the mixture to the saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, stirring occasionally, until the consistency of ketchup, about 5 minutes. Stir the cherry mixture into the mustard mixture, a little at a time, until completely incorporated*. This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Step 4: Heat your grill to medium-high. Use a lightly oiled kitchen towel to carefully grease the grill grate.

Step 5: In a small bowl, stir together the cumin, sherry vinegar, and honey. Reserve 1 tbsp in another bowl and use the rest to brush all over the pork. Let the pork stand for 5 minutes while the grill heats.

Step 6: Grill the pork, turning every 45 seconds to cook evenly, until the centre is still a little pink, about 8 minutes. Remove from the grill, brush with the reserved honey mixture, and let rest for 10 minutes. Serve with the cherry mustard.

* Whenever I'm adding a very hot mixture to a room temperature one, as with the cherry and mustard here, I add just a tiny bit at first and gradually add more and more. It's important to temper it; otherwise, you'll end up with globs of mustard paste in your sauce.

See more recipes from Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

Reprinted with permission from Jean-Georges Vongerichten's Home Cooking with Jean-Georges (2011 Clarkson Potter).

Photographer: 

John Kernick

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